Generative Music und modulare Synths (Vorsicht! it´s English)

rofilm
rofilm
......
I wrote my new e-book "A Systematic Introduction to Making Generative Music With Modular Synths" to prevent you from having to jump here and there on the web, learning a bit here, getting a bit of insights there - and losing orientation most of the times.
Together with my new e-book (323 pages, 202 graphics) there come 118 synth patches and 108 embedded videos of a total length of 14 hours and 27 minutes. You´ll find more about the book at my website at

https://dev.rofilm-media.net/node/267
And here is the content followed by a quotation of the complete first chapter:

Content

Chapter 0: About This Course And Some Words About What Generative Music Is 6

Chapter 1: Real Randomness vs. Complex Cycles (and the combination of both) 10

Chapter 1.1: LFOs 10

Chapter 1.2: Other Devices Generating Regular Cycles 59

Chapter 1.2.1: Looping Envelopes 59

Chapter 1.2.2: Sequencers 64

Chapter 1.2.3: Shift Registers With Feedback 65

Chapter 1.2.4: Sequential Switches 70

Chapter 1.2.5: The Turing Machine – Part 1 74

Chapter 1.2.6: Samples and Recordings 77

Chapter 1.3: Randomness, Probability and Stochastic 79

Chapter 1.3.1: Some Basic Definitions 79

Chapter 1.3.2: Sample & Hold 84

Chapter 1.3.3: A Short Glimpse at the Turing Machine And at Shift Registers Again 92

Chapter 1.3.4: Perfect Pseudo Randomness: Gray Code Modules 93

Chapter 1.3.5: Imperfect Pseudo Randomness: Euclidean Sequencers 99

Chapter 1.3.6: Random Trigger (Percussion) Sequencers with Different Amounts of Randomness 102

Chapter 1.3.7: Stochastic Sequencers 105

Chapter 1.3.8: Probability Gates (Random Clocked Gates) 108

Chapter 1.3.9: Bernoulli Gates 110


Chapter 2: What to Modulate And to Trigger 115

Chapter 2.1: Pitch 116

Chapter 2.2: Timbre 125

Chapter 2.2.1: Filter 125

Chapter 2.2.2: Shapers 127

Chapter 2.2.3: Partials (additive) 130

Chapter 2.2.4: FM/PM 131

Chapter 2.3: Voices 134

Chapter 2.4: Rhythm 137

Chapter 2.5: Effects 147

Chapter 2.6: Envelopes 149

Chapter 2.7: Quantizers 153

Chapter 2.8: Grains 155

Chapter 2.9: Sample (Player) 159

Chapter 2.10: Slew Limiter 160

Chapter 2.11: Comparators 161

Chapter 2:12: Pitch Shifter 163



Chapter 3: Compositional Aspects of Generative Music 165

Chapter 3.1: General Thoughts, Strategies And Basic Compositional Decisions 166

Chapter 3.2: Basic Compositional Techniques 177

Chapter 3.2.1: Contrasting 178

Chapter 3.2.2: Repeating, Modifying and Inverting Relations 180

Chapter 3.2.3: Basic but Exclusively Generative Techniques 183

Chapter 3.3: Specific Compositional Techniques 190

Chapter 3.3.1: Pitch Dependency 190

Chapter 3.3.2: Rhythm 192

Chapter 3.3.3: Tension and Layers 195

Chapter 3.4: Certain Patch Techniques And Examples 197

Chapter 3.4.1: Switching Voices and Larger Parts of the Patch 197

Chapter 3.4.2: Sculpture Randomness and Setting Borders 200

Chapter 3.4.3: Jumping between certain BPM and Inverting Pitch Lines 200

Chapter 3.4.4: Mixing Stable and Random Elements 205


Chapter 4: Some Building Blocks of Generative Patching 207

Chapter 4.1: The Instrumentation of Envelopes 207

Chapter 4.2: 5 Faces of Randomness 217

Chapter 4.3: Random Harmonies 227



Chapter 5: Certain Modules with Generative Potential 233

Chapter 5.1: The Turing Machine 235

Chapter 5.2: Befaco´s “Rampage” 241

Chapter 5.3: Instruo “Céis” 247

Chapter 5.4: Mutable Instruments “Stages” 250

Chapter 5.5: Mutable Instruments “Grids” 255

Chapter 5.6: Intruo “tágh” 259

Chapter 5.7: Mutable Instruments “Marbles” 262

Chapter 5.8: Instruo “harmonàig” 276

Chapter 5.9: 4ms “Spectral Multiband Resonator” 285

Chapter 5.10: Mutable Instruments “Clouds” 290



Epilogue 294

Appendix A: Feedback Graphs (only 1 LFO) 299

Appendix B: Note Frequencies 316

Appendix C: “Rampage” Block Diagram 319

Appendix D: Your Personal Advantage 320

Appendix E: Copyright 322

Appendix F: Contact and Social Media 323


“Chapter 0:

About This Course And Some

Words About What


Generative Music Is


Do you know this?

You see and hear somebody doing something interesting, something beautiful, something you would like to do too.

You try.

It´s not what you had expected it to be, it´s not how you had expected it to be.

So you fiddle with your equipment.

You come upon something nice – sometimes.

You come upon something – accidentally.

But you feel:

there´s still something missing.

OK – it´s fun most of the times, but it could be more than that.

It should be more than that.

You want to get better.

But how? How to start getting better?

Where to start?

Do you know this?

You need a system.

The matter you have been working on needs a systematic approach.

You need it.

We all need it.

Here it is:


A systematic introduction to making generative music with modular synthesisers.


The term “Generative Music” is a quite new one, and the musician, composer and sound designer Brian Eno is said to have alerted a broader audience to this term.

Generative music is that kind of music, which is created – normally played - by any kind of analogue or digital machinery, while permanently changing in rhythm or pitch or timbre or number of voices etc.

The producing – playing – machine may be a computer, a modular synthesiser or any other kind of gear, which is able to produce audible events and able to accept and follow certain rules or algorithms.

In modular synthesis these “rules” are our patches, and these patches are what this book is about.

“Permanently changing” is movement, and every moving system needs a motor, an engine that drives it, that keeps the system going on moving. In the following chapter 1 I´m going to talk about the different kinds of engines, which keep our modular generative music system going.

And don´t worry: You´ll be able to reproduce everything, that is described in this book. You´ll be able to reproduce every single example and every single sonic experiment, which you´re going to meet on these pages. You can do so using hardware (if you have got the money to buy all the modules, which appear in this book), or software. You can even use the freeware “VCV Rack” to follow me here in a very practical way. All my examples are made with VCV rack to make it not only easy, but also inexpensive to follow this course. But I´ve always tried not to get too specific into VCV, so that you´ll be able to find corresponding modules in Voltage Modular, or even in Softube´s Modular and other software modular synth systems.

Let´s go for it then. “

Thank you for reading my post!
RolfEBOOK GENERATIVE MUSIC.jpg
 
Donauwelle
Donauwelle
Malandro
I wrote my new e-book "A Systematic Introduction to Making Generative Music With Modular Synths" to prevent you from having to jump here and there on the web, learning a bit here, getting a bit of insights there - and losing orientation most of the times.
Together with my new e-book (323 pages, 202 graphics) there come 118 synth patches and 108 embedded videos of a total length of 14 hours and 27 minutes. You´ll find more about the book at my website at

https://dev.rofilm-media.net/node/267
And here is the content followed by a quotation of the complete first chapter:

Content

Chapter 0: About This Course And Some Words About What Generative Music Is 6

Chapter 1: Real Randomness vs. Complex Cycles (and the combination of both) 10

Chapter 1.1: LFOs 10

Chapter 1.2: Other Devices Generating Regular Cycles 59

Chapter 1.2.1: Looping Envelopes 59

Chapter 1.2.2: Sequencers 64

Chapter 1.2.3: Shift Registers With Feedback 65

Chapter 1.2.4: Sequential Switches 70

Chapter 1.2.5: The Turing Machine – Part 1 74

Chapter 1.2.6: Samples and Recordings 77

Chapter 1.3: Randomness, Probability and Stochastic 79

Chapter 1.3.1: Some Basic Definitions 79

Chapter 1.3.2: Sample & Hold 84

Chapter 1.3.3: A Short Glimpse at the Turing Machine And at Shift Registers Again 92

Chapter 1.3.4: Perfect Pseudo Randomness: Gray Code Modules 93

Chapter 1.3.5: Imperfect Pseudo Randomness: Euclidean Sequencers 99

Chapter 1.3.6: Random Trigger (Percussion) Sequencers with Different Amounts of Randomness 102

Chapter 1.3.7: Stochastic Sequencers 105

Chapter 1.3.8: Probability Gates (Random Clocked Gates) 108

Chapter 1.3.9: Bernoulli Gates 110


Chapter 2: What to Modulate And to Trigger 115

Chapter 2.1: Pitch 116

Chapter 2.2: Timbre 125

Chapter 2.2.1: Filter 125

Chapter 2.2.2: Shapers 127

Chapter 2.2.3: Partials (additive) 130

Chapter 2.2.4: FM/PM 131

Chapter 2.3: Voices 134

Chapter 2.4: Rhythm 137

Chapter 2.5: Effects 147

Chapter 2.6: Envelopes 149

Chapter 2.7: Quantizers 153

Chapter 2.8: Grains 155

Chapter 2.9: Sample (Player) 159

Chapter 2.10: Slew Limiter 160

Chapter 2.11: Comparators 161

Chapter 2:12: Pitch Shifter 163



Chapter 3: Compositional Aspects of Generative Music 165

Chapter 3.1: General Thoughts, Strategies And Basic Compositional Decisions 166

Chapter 3.2: Basic Compositional Techniques 177

Chapter 3.2.1: Contrasting 178

Chapter 3.2.2: Repeating, Modifying and Inverting Relations 180

Chapter 3.2.3: Basic but Exclusively Generative Techniques 183

Chapter 3.3: Specific Compositional Techniques 190

Chapter 3.3.1: Pitch Dependency 190

Chapter 3.3.2: Rhythm 192

Chapter 3.3.3: Tension and Layers 195

Chapter 3.4: Certain Patch Techniques And Examples 197

Chapter 3.4.1: Switching Voices and Larger Parts of the Patch 197

Chapter 3.4.2: Sculpture Randomness and Setting Borders 200

Chapter 3.4.3: Jumping between certain BPM and Inverting Pitch Lines 200

Chapter 3.4.4: Mixing Stable and Random Elements 205


Chapter 4: Some Building Blocks of Generative Patching 207

Chapter 4.1: The Instrumentation of Envelopes 207

Chapter 4.2: 5 Faces of Randomness 217

Chapter 4.3: Random Harmonies 227



Chapter 5: Certain Modules with Generative Potential 233

Chapter 5.1: The Turing Machine 235

Chapter 5.2: Befaco´s “Rampage” 241

Chapter 5.3: Instruo “Céis” 247

Chapter 5.4: Mutable Instruments “Stages” 250

Chapter 5.5: Mutable Instruments “Grids” 255

Chapter 5.6: Intruo “tágh” 259

Chapter 5.7: Mutable Instruments “Marbles” 262

Chapter 5.8: Instruo “harmonàig” 276

Chapter 5.9: 4ms “Spectral Multiband Resonator” 285

Chapter 5.10: Mutable Instruments “Clouds” 290



Epilogue 294

Appendix A: Feedback Graphs (only 1 LFO) 299

Appendix B: Note Frequencies 316

Appendix C: “Rampage” Block Diagram 319

Appendix D: Your Personal Advantage 320

Appendix E: Copyright 322

Appendix F: Contact and Social Media 323


“Chapter 0:

About This Course And Some

Words About What


Generative Music Is


Do you know this?

You see and hear somebody doing something interesting, something beautiful, something you would like to do too.

You try.

It´s not what you had expected it to be, it´s not how you had expected it to be.

So you fiddle with your equipment.

You come upon something nice – sometimes.

You come upon something – accidentally.

But you feel:

there´s still something missing.

OK – it´s fun most of the times, but it could be more than that.

It should be more than that.

You want to get better.

But how? How to start getting better?

Where to start?

Do you know this?

You need a system.

The matter you have been working on needs a systematic approach.

You need it.

We all need it.

Here it is:


A systematic introduction to making generative music with modular synthesisers.


The term “Generative Music” is a quite new one, and the musician, composer and sound designer Brian Eno is said to have alerted a broader audience to this term.

Generative music is that kind of music, which is created – normally played - by any kind of analogue or digital machinery, while permanently changing in rhythm or pitch or timbre or number of voices etc.

The producing – playing – machine may be a computer, a modular synthesiser or any other kind of gear, which is able to produce audible events and able to accept and follow certain rules or algorithms.

In modular synthesis these “rules” are our patches, and these patches are what this book is about.

“Permanently changing” is movement, and every moving system needs a motor, an engine that drives it, that keeps the system going on moving. In the following chapter 1 I´m going to talk about the different kinds of engines, which keep our modular generative music system going.

And don´t worry: You´ll be able to reproduce everything, that is described in this book. You´ll be able to reproduce every single example and every single sonic experiment, which you´re going to meet on these pages. You can do so using hardware (if you have got the money to buy all the modules, which appear in this book), or software. You can even use the freeware “VCV Rack” to follow me here in a very practical way. All my examples are made with VCV rack to make it not only easy, but also inexpensive to follow this course. But I´ve always tried not to get too specific into VCV, so that you´ll be able to find corresponding modules in Voltage Modular, or even in Softube´s Modular and other software modu
Let´s go for it then. “

Thank you for reading my post!
RolfAnhang anzeigen 107917

Hätte gerne das als gebundenes Buch.
 
Donauwelle
Donauwelle
Malandro

@rofilm

Donated with Paypal. What happens now? How to download the book?
 
rofilm
rofilm
......
Als gebundenes Buch ist es zu teuer. Und der doch wohl interessante Zusatzservice der im Buch verlinkten Videos wuerde auch wegfallen. Allenfalls als Zusatz CD waeren die Videos dann auch verfuegbar, aber ein flussiges Lesen und Video anschauen waere das auch nicht. Fuer mich war das Hauptargument gegen ein gebundenes Buch ein rein mathematisch/finanzielles: wahrscheinlicher Buchverkauf eines Jahres: ca. 50 Stueck = 23,24 $ x 50 = 1.162,- $. Vorlaufkosten fuer den Buchdruck von 50 Stueck (falls so geringe Auflagen ueberhaupt moeglich sind): 1.685,- $. Minus: 523,- $ . In meiner Waehrung: 10.943,- Kronen. Dafuer, dass ich also 6 Monate lang nichts anderes getan habe, als an dem Buch zu arbeiten verliere ich 10.943,- Kronen plus ein halbes Jahr lang keine Einnahmen. Das geht (leider) nicht. Auch so habe ich das Buch nur schreiben koennen, weil ich vorher dafuer eisern gespart habe, ca. 6 Monate lang keine Einnahmen haben zu koennen. Ja, in gebundener Form waer es rein optisch schoen. Gehr aber eben nicht. Vielen Dank nochmal fuer den Kauf meines E-Buchs - und vor allem fuer das Interesse daran.
Mejte se (das heisst: Macht´s gut)
Enjoy your day!
Rolf
 
laux
laux
_laux
Als gebundenes Buch ist es zu teuer.
Ja kann ich nachvollziehen, ist auch voll ok.
Für mich kommt aber nur ein gebundenes Buch in Frage, wegen ins Regal stellen und drin blättern ist immernoch ein ganz anderes Erlebnis.
In Digital gibt es halt bereits soviel (und meist auch noch kostenlos, zb. Youtube.)
Wünsche dir weiterhin viel Erfolg mit deinem E-Book!
 
einseinsnull
einseinsnull
[nur noch musik]
jemand der nur leute kennt, die sowas ohne vorlagen machen (und auf der anderen seite niemand, der es aus büchern gelernt hätte.)

und der aus prinzip keine bücher liest, die mehr als 4 seiten haben.

ja ist schon klar, in wahrheit dauert programmieren oder löten eventuell doch ein bischen länger als ein buch zu lesen. :P doch was führt zum ziel?
 
Tommi
Tommi
|||
Ich habe es mir gestern gekauft. Den Aufbau finde ich gelungen. Alles ist gut erklärt und sogar illustriert.

Es richtet sich aber eher an Anfänger (wie mich) in dem Bereich. Oder auch an diejenigen, die mit generativen Patches noch nichts gemacht haben und einen Einstieg suchen. Mir persönlich gefällt ganz gut, dass auf Prosa größtenteils verzichtet wird.

Was man erhält ist ein PDF, welches aber auch auf einem EBook-Reader wirklich gut dargestellt wird.

Zusätzlich werden alle im Buch behandelten Patches als VCV-Presets mitgeliefert.

Es steckt viel Arbeit in dem Buch, auch wenn es jetzt nicht unbedingt "professionelles" Niveau hat was Sprache, Layout und Illustration angeht. Das stört mich nicht im Geringsten. Denn trotzdem werden die Informationen verständlich und nachvollziehbar präsentiert.

Von mir also eine Empfehlung für diejenigen, die sich in diesem Bereich mal etwas einarbeiten wollen.
 
einseinsnull
einseinsnull
[nur noch musik]
Ganz sicher und schnell die Lektüre des genannten Buches.

ich sage das ja auch immer über videos, aber ich kenne ehrlich gesagt auch nicht viele leute, die solche dinge aus büchern gelernt haben. eigentlich kenne ich nur autodidakten, aber das kann an meiner ignoranz liegen, bei mir in der blase ist das halt so.

aber ebooks sind natürlich eine ganze ecke cooler als videos, besser gegliedert, durchsuchbar, leichter abzuspeichern usw.
 
Zuletzt bearbeitet:
Donauwelle
Donauwelle
Malandro
Von mir also eine Empfehlung für diejenigen, die sich in diesem Bereich mal etwas einarbeiten wollen.
Unbedingt!! Ich gehe gemächlich voran. Exerziere die ersten Beispiele, die nur mit LFOs arbeiten, mit dem Aodyo Anima Phy durch. Der war gerade zur Hand und begann auch gleich sehr schön generativ vor sich hin zu komponieren.
Man braucht also nicht unbedingt ein Modularsystem, wenngleich der Autor damit beispielhaft arbeitet. Ich habe keines. Umso mehr Spaß macht es, die Beispiele auf meinen Gerätepark hin umzudenken.
 
Tommi
Tommi
|||
Ich selbst arbeite mich gerade in Pure Data / generative Sound ein und hoffe auf ein paar Mitnahmeeffekte. ;-)

So kann ich dann sehen welche Eigenschaften z.B. ein LFO haben sollte um schlussendlich einen generativen Patch zu erhalten. In PD muss man sich seine Komponenten ja zusammen "bauen" wie man mag. Da ist dein Buch dann ziemlich hilfreich weil es die wichtigen Funktionen âus genau dieser Sicht ganz gut erklärt.
 
Donauwelle
Donauwelle
Malandro
Alles PDF. Mit zahllosen Links zu Beispielvideos. Alle Beispiele im Buch lassen sich mit den Modulen der Freeware VCV Rack https://vcvrack.com nachbauen. Genial.
 
Zuletzt bearbeitet:
Herbie
Herbie
||||
Für Anfänger gewiss sehr gut. Für spezielle Fragen gibt es dann das Forum...und zwar auf Deutsch.
 
Donauwelle
Donauwelle
Malandro
Für Anfänger gewiss sehr gut. Für spezielle Fragen gibt es dann das Forum...und zwar auf Deutsch.
Na ja. Viele präsentieren ihre generativen Werke, sagen aber kaum, wie sie sie gemacht haben. Oder verweisen auf irgend eine dedizierte Software bzw. ein Plugin.
 
einseinsnull
einseinsnull
[nur noch musik]
Na ja. Viele präsentieren ihre generativen Werke, sagen aber kaum, wie sie sie gemacht haben. Oder verweisen auf irgend eine dedizierte Software bzw. ein Plugin.


"generativ" ist ja meist auch ohne selbst groß was zu machen.

bei "algoritmisch" könnte man es erklären. :)
 
Feinstrom
Feinstrom
|||||||||||
Hätte gerne das als gebundenes Buch.
Wenn es das als PDF gibt, könnte man es bei Epubli oder ähnlichen Dienstleistern ausdrucken lassen. Das mache ich hin und wieder mit Bedienungsanleitungen - auch als günstiges Paperback deutlich angenehmer als ringgebundene Ausdrucke aus dem örtlichen Copyshop.

Schöne Grüße
Bert
 
haebbmaster
haebbmaster
Thermοdynamikleugner
ok, @rofilm hat dann nach 2 1/2 Stunden geantwortet

man muss bei Paypal in die Bemerkung reinschreiben, welches Produkt man haben will, das hatte ich nicht gewusst. Nachdem ich dann geantwortet hatte, hatte ich innerhalb von einer halben Stunde den Link auf eine Dropbox.
Außerdem gibt es diese Woche noch sein EBook "In the World auf Grains" kostenlos dazu.

Es sind PDFs, die zum Lesen auf einen EBook Reader optimiert sind. Ausdrucken würde ich sie nicht unbedingt. Es sind > 300 Seiten, die Schrift ist recht groß damit es auf den Reader passt.

Bin gespannt auf den Inhalt.
 
einseinsnull
einseinsnull
[nur noch musik]
klar, wenn man "laufen lassen" als aktive tätgikeit des beobachters einordnet? :P

die ideale art des musikmachens für beamte. press play and go sleep.
 
 


Neueste Beiträge

News

Oben