AKAI MPC 60 - 5000

B

ballpark

.
Ich denke es wäre sinnvoll einen Thread als Pool Tips und Tricks rund um die AKAI MPC zu erstellen.

Da ja doch immer wieder User fragen zur Bedienung haben, denke ist es ganz sinnvoll. Bitte keine "wie klingt das Teil" etc. das wurde und wird ja in anderen Threads geklärt.

AKAI only !!!

Zunächst ein paar Tips von http://www.mpc2000xl.com/:

These instructions are refering to the regular 2000 but it should work the same for the XL.

1. Loop your sample the usual way at first in trim mode and make note of the tempo provided by the BPM feature (or whatever you've changed it to) then turn the "LOOP" off.

2. Precisely pinpoint the very end trim point of the loop; make sure there's no unwanted sound or waveforms at the end that you can't hear (you'll see why later).

3. Take the start trim point of your loop back like 4000 samples (or a number you can remember easily) if possible so that later on if you want to change the start point your not stuck with what you originally cut it to. I like to call this pad.

4. Hit "LOOP", "FIT", "DO IT" + "TRIM", "CUT", "DO IT". Now you should be left with the exact end of the loop and 4000 samples of pad at the beginning (which you'll ignore for now).

5. Make a copy of your sample, in zone edit make the zone fit the whole sample and reverse it.

6. Go back to the original sample, go back to zone edit, set the start and end zone points to the very end, hit "EDIT" choose "INSERT SOUND->ZONE START", choose the copy you just reversed, and "DO IT".

7. Now you should have the original sound with 4000 samples of pad at the beginnig (if you used any) and the same sound backwards tacked right on to the end.

Before you do anything else-DO NOT change the end trim point! However, set your "PLAY X" to "ALL" since the ending trim point will not reflect what you just added on to the zone end. Hit "PLAY X" and make sure there isn't a pop or a weird glitch where the two sounds meet (if there is, take the end trim point back about 100 samples and repeat steps 4-6, sometimes it takes a couple of tries but it usually works).

8. Once you've succefully merged the original sound with the backwards copy right on to the end, take your start trim point forward 4000 samples (or whatever number you used for pad if any), take your end trim point all the way to the end and assign the sample to a pad. Set the "OVERLAP" to "NOTE OFF".

9. Set the tempo of your sequence according to what the auto BPM feature provided on step 1 and record your sample on to a track.

10. HERE'S THE MOST IMPORTANT STEP OF ALL: After you record your loop/loops in a sequence, go to step edit and adjust the duration of each note using the 96 parts per quarter note equation:

Sample lasts two whole measures=D:768
Sample lasts one whole measure=D:384
Sample lasts 1/2 a measure=D:192
Sample lasts 1/4 a measure=D:96
and so on...

Steps 2-8 are so you don't get a gap of dead space at the end of your sample when your trying to loop it in a sequence set to the tempo that the BPM feature provides. Or if it's looped in trim mode you won't get that popping sound a the end when its's looped in a sequence, instead you're just telling it to play exactly the amount of duration time allowed for note off overlap using 96 ppq.

I know it seems kinda complicated but once you do it a few times you'll realize it's pretty simple and the end result makes your whole track sound pretty good.

Also, leaving 4000 samples of pad at the beginning of the sample isn't necesary for this to work but I do it on all my samples and it does come in very handy.


Ist etwas tricky, probiert es selbst aus. Liest sich kompliziert, ist es aber nicht.
 
B

ballpark

.
sampling technik:

http://www.loopers-delight.com/tips/drum_programming.html

Drum Programming, Loops and Breakbeat Technique

by Nicolas Hall
http://www.breakbeat-cafe.net


I think most people who make anything funk, breakbeat drum & bass, or hip-hop would agree that 'Swing' is crucial to the effectiveness of a beat. The other key factors in a programming sense are 'dynamic' and 'accent'. So many people get wound up when their beats sound 'sterile' or mechanical' this is due to the fact that computers and sequencers lock to perfect BPM. A computer on it's own does not interpret rhythm the way a good drummer does, There are however, certain machines that have their own swing parameters like the Akai MPC range of sampling drum machines which are used extensively by hip hop producers.

Swing is not the easiest thing in the world to analyze but as a general rule good drummers will play slightly late and that's why in all funky records you get that slight dip at the start of the bar, take 'Superstition' by Stevie Wonder or 'Billie Jean' by Michael Jackson, these are both very simple beats, 'Superstition' is of course live drums whilst 'Billie Jean' was programmed but no less funky than 'Superstition' I emphasize this point to demonstrate that a programmed beat can be every bit at groovy as a beat played on a drum kit.

Expanding on the Billie Jean point, Hip Hop beats are really very simple. If you listen to the Neptunes they tend to create the swing in their beats by quantizing the kicks and snares and playing the hi hats in by hand, this creates a very tight beat which is off set by a loose hi hat, try it works, but don't forget your accents - As a starting point just take the first snare of your beat and turn the velocity down, then notice how your head starts nodding and your foot starts tapping a little more, you are giving the beat feel. Also remember that if you are using reverb the louder snare will push the reverb harder than the soft snare so your creating more ambience that way. Then try your kick drums, if your not sure which hits to adjust just pick apart a beat your feeling, I remember me and friend picking apart a Gangstarr beat and were able to almost replicate it by adjusting the velocities of each hit (admittedly it took a while to get it right!)

If you're a newbie then a common trick when learning to make good grooves is to create a template with an existing loop. The idea is take a loop you like that's got a good feel to it and then place your own hits over the break, then take the break out and see if your hits are sounding funky. This can take a while and it's crucial to think about the strength of each hit, or the 'dynamic'. Each kick will not be the same strength nor will the snares or the hats, pick the loop apart, dissect it and you'll soon see that there are certain consistencies in all good beats.

If you're using live loops and like to layer them with drum sequences, you should be thinking about time, space and frequencies. So if you have a fairly heavy loop then layering it with heavy kick drums is probably not gonna sound good. Think about filling holes, are their any frequencies that could be filled up? Or is there space in the loop for extra hits? Try working in layers just adding one hit at a time, also filtering works well, you could take some of the frequencies out of your loop as you drop your drum sequences in to make room for them. I think one the masters of this technique is Liam Howlett of the Prodigy. He runs breakbeats and gives them extra balls by laying a kick drum underneath to add extra intensity to certain passages in his set, but he's careful not to overlap frequencies to much. A good place to start if you using breakbeats is the Roland Tr-808 kick drum which is around the 50hz mark, which is sub bass territory so it will sit underneath most breaks very well.

If your hell bent on making killer beats and loops, then perseverance is crucial, keep at it, it will come together, listen to beats you like and pick them apart, identify the subtleties that make it happen. I know some producers get fed up when their beats sound to clean, or they are trying to create a new breakbeat and then compare it to sample they took from vinyl and get down on there own beat. Think about what a breakbeat really is, think about its history what has happened to it to make it sound the way it does. I'm sure you've noticed how some breaks have a certain something like a magic dust you can't put your finger on. Let me share what I know with you about that.

Most breaks, though not all, are taken from recordings of live drums, some of them are pretty old, so you have the ambience of live drums and the room they were recorded in, you have the fact that natural decay and reverb of each drum is likely to have bled into the other mics on the kit, and that most engineers used overhead mics which pick up the whole kit with two mics. Then consider that many of these breaks will have been recorded to analogue tape with saturation which will create extra warmth and harmonics. The next step comes from old sampling technology like the SP-1200 and the Akai s-950 / mpc -60, these samplers sampled at 12- bit (bear in mind that most computers now are at least 24-bit if not more) and that the samples themselves where taken from vinyl and on and on the process goes, with each new reverb and eq adding more and more to the break. In terms of giving your breaks that character there are a number of things you can try, for example buying an old four track cassette machine to dump your beats onto then re-sample it, if your using a sampler like the s-950 then try pushing the input meters a little harder than usual add reverbs and resample it, each time you put your loop through a new channel you will be adding something to it. Also distortion is fantastic for breaks, if you have any amp plug ins then try them, the Amplitude one is particularly good, you don't need to go mad with it just used subtly it works great.

To finish I would just like to say again, stick with it keep trying, keep listening to records, if you like to read about technique then do so, you can learn so much from other producers. Remember the strength of your hits is important as is the way it swings, good luck!

Nicolas Hall
http://www.breakbeat-cafe.net
 
M

Münster

.
Echt hilfreich; vielen Dank! Gerade für Leute wie mich ( ich überlege gerade, mir eine MPC zuzulegen) nützlich.
 
ppg360

ppg360

fummdich-fummdich-ratata
Münster schrieb:
Echt hilfreich; vielen Dank! Gerade für Leute wie mich ( ich überlege gerade, mir eine MPC zuzulegen) nützlich.

Ich stecke in derselben Klemme... und ich kann mich nicht entscheiden, ob ich eine 5000 nehmen soll (weil es die neueste Variante ist und sie noch diesen Achtspur-Digitalrecorder an Bord hat) oder eine 3000 (weil ihr allgemein der beste Klang beschieden wird). Eine 60 will ich nicht (ist mir zu alt, und 12 Bit brauche ich nicht).

Ich bin neugierig, was hier noch alles kommt.

Stephen
 
B

ballpark

.
ppg360 schrieb:
Münster schrieb:
Echt hilfreich; vielen Dank! Gerade für Leute wie mich ( ich überlege gerade, mir eine MPC zuzulegen) nützlich.

Ich stecke in derselben Klemme... und ich kann mich nicht entscheiden, ob ich eine 5000 nehmen soll (weil es die neueste Variante ist und sie noch diesen Achtspur-Digitalrecorder an Bord hat) oder eine 3000 (weil ihr allgemein der beste Klang beschieden wird). Eine 60 will ich nicht (ist mir zu alt, und 12 Bit brauche ich nicht).

Ich bin neugierig, was hier noch alles kommt.

Stephen


Dito. Ich hab genau das gleiche Problem. Wir hatten das im
MPC 5000 Thread erörtert. Ich denke es kommen die 5000 oder die 4000 in Frage.

Die 4000 hat gute Wandler 24bit und 96khz. Aber kein HD Recorder. Der HD Recorder der 5000 geht nur im Song Mode und die 5000er macht nur 16bit bei 44,1khz bei sehr viel weniger RAM!!
 
B

ballpark

.
Ehm, joa dient nur zur Übersicht.

Ich dachte nur das in den anderen Threads das meiste schon steht.

Hier soll wirklich nur die MPC diskutiert und durch leuchtet werden.

Ob die Kisten mit Outboard synchron laufen wurde ja nun mehrmals bestätigt. Aber hier können die Schritte wie man das macht gepostet werden.

Keine Theorie sondern Praxis ;-)
 
E

Ed Solo

..
ich hatte bislang so ziemlich jede MPC 'wo gibt' und habe immer noch einen 60, 3000 und 2000Xl in gebrauch.

Alle Maschinen klingen unterschiedlich und die Hierarchie ist mE 1000/2500/5000 < 2000XL < 3000 <60, wobei der sprung zur 60 der mit abstand groesste ist. Das 12 Bit Sampling laesst die Samples lauter, groesser und lebendiger klingen. Ich habe alle meine Drumsamples durch die 60 resampled.
 
Feldrauschen

Feldrauschen

||||
finde die 1000 er ziemlich cool. aber nur mit jj os. super os support. die 5000 er ist zu buggy.
 
mintberry crunch

mintberry crunch

.
ich frag mich, wieso es keinen 12bit modus bei der 1000/2500er gibt...


und da in meinem persönlichen mpc-thread (www.sequencer.de/synthesizer/viewtopic. ... 7&start=50) keine antwort kam, frag ich hier nochmal (hab ne 1k recht neu noch ohne jj):

hab neulich die cf card zu meinem bruder mitgenommen, der die 2500er mit jjos hat. hab das zeug geladen und.. es klingt komplett anders! filter einstellungen und andere parameter mussten neu gesetzt werden...
dachte jjos ist 100 % kompatibel. muss ich nach dem wechsel auf jj um meine ganzen (noch) wohlklingenden tracks fürchten?
 
B

ballpark

.
Das ist leider etwas off topic, da es hier um das "WIE" in der Benutzung geht.

Aber um deine Frage zu beantworten, ein Wechsel bringt immer Parameterwechsel mit sich.

Nur weil jeder sagt die 1000er und 2500er sind gleich arbeiten die sich nicht gleich.

Nicht böse gemeint, nicht zu spamen.
 
Feldrauschen

Feldrauschen

||||
mintberry crunch schrieb:
ich frag mich, wieso es keinen 12bit modus bei der 1000/2500er gibt...


und da in meinem persönlichen mpc-thread (viewtopic.php?f=5&t=69307&start=50) keine antwort kam, frag ich hier nochmal (hab ne 1k recht neu noch ohne jj):

hab neulich die cf card zu meinem bruder mitgenommen, der die 2500er mit jjos hat. hab das zeug geladen und.. es klingt komplett anders! filter einstellungen und andere parameter mussten neu gesetzt werden...
dachte jjos ist 100 % kompatibel. muss ich nach dem wechsel auf jj um meine ganzen (noch) wohlklingenden tracks fürchten?

in jj os gibt es downsampling bis 8 bit odersowas!! plus bitcrusher als effekt, klingt wohl nicht ganz nach
emu 12 bit aber immerhin.

ist doch klar dassvon 1000 ohne jj zu 2500 mit jj es einen riesen parametersprung gibt.

wenn du fragen zu jj os hast pm,(oder neuer threat) habs schon lange, mpc ohne jj os geht garnicht!!
 
mintberry crunch

mintberry crunch

.
ist doch klar dassvon 1000 ohne jj zu 2500 mit jj es einen riesen parametersprung gibt.

hm... ist mir nicht klar.


ja ist mir schon klar, dass jjos muss. bin aber noch nicht zu gekommen...
 
microbug

microbug

MIDI Inquisator
Gute Idee, dieser Thread.

Frage: lohnt sich das e-Book "using your MPC with Ableton Live" oder stehen da nur Sachen drin, die man auch den Handbüchern der beiden Komponenten entnehmen könnte?
 
B

ballpark

.
was hast du denn vor?

im prinzip brauchst du Ableton nicht wenn du eine MPC hast.

Ableton ist klar überlegen, keine Frage.

Zum Samples cutten geht es. Ich würde aber Audacity, Wavelab oder Bias Peak empfehlen.

Schau mal hier, das hab ich bei der Quelle http://www.mpc2000xl.com gefunden

Using MPC and Computer Together

Here's a tip if you want to work with your computer and MPC2000XL without much midi repatching.

Here's the scenario. You have several modules connected to the midi outs of the MPC2000XL. Say you want compose on your PC and be able to hear your modules, but the MPC in the way (since you like to keep everything hooked to it). Typically you could put a midi patchbay between the MPC and the modules then connect your computer to the patchbay to access the modules. You then have to switch your patchbay settings to access the modules by computer or MPC depending on which you wanted to work.

Here's another way to work. Connect your computer's midi outs to the MPC's midi in's. If have two midi out's on your computer all the better. Set the MPC's midi to "multitrack". That would be changing the "S:" on the bottom left of the main screen to "M:". Open window on the "M:". In this multitrack screen set the input channels to correspond to tracks and their appropriate midi channels. Close this window. In your computer sequencer, mirror the track/midi relationships to what you have on the MPC. The MPC in this setup is acting as a "midi thru" box. You can now enter notes (and play) on you computer sequencer and hear the results on the appropriate modules. When done arranging on the PC, save the midi file and load it in the MPC. The MPC will play the same as you had on the computer. I think you can even leave the MPC in "multitrack" since it just affects "recording" (which you really aren't doing, just "thru"ing the info). Simplicity is best! I have patchbays, but I try not to use them.

Fewer components means less chance of failure and quicker timing. If you use a master controller, you can put it on the input of your computer for note entry.

Along with this is another idea to save some time when transferring sequences from computer to MPC. Create your default layout on the MPC with tracks named and assigned to midi channels or drum tracks. Basically enter everything but note data. Save this sequence as a midi file type 1. Load this midi file in your favorite computer sequencer. Perform your note entry and editing, but do not re-arrange tracks. You can even preview from the computer using the above method. When done, save the midi file and then load it on the MPC. All track assignments should be same as your template, ready to go. The reason this should work (I can't check myself since I do not have a computer in the studio) is that the MPC saves files within the midi spec. All the extra data the MPC uses for names and assignments is embedded within the midi file. As long as your computer sequencer does not mangle the existing data or you don't modify it yourself, the data should still be there when reloading on the MPC.

Das ist sehr interessant, da man jegliche MPC mit dem Computer vereinen kann (nutzt man noch die 8 Einzel Outs über ein Audio Interface (RME, Presonus, Focusrite).

Wenn man Ableton ( o.ä) als Sequencer einsetzt hat man nur den Klang der MPC aber nicht den Swing den der Sequencer hat. Die MPC ist dann nur ein Drum Modul.

Allerdings kann man den Spieß auch umdrehen!! Ein Midi Out der MPC an ein Midi In des PCs. Dann ein Template anlegen wie oben beschrieben, und nun kann man die Noten die man eingespielt hat in Ableton aufzeichen. Wenn man die Lösung von oben noch zusätzlich anwendet gehts in beide Richtungen.



Alles andere können wir auch hier klären.

direkt spezifisch für dein Vorhaben: http://www.akaipro.com/syncableton
 
microbug

microbug

MIDI Inquisator
Danke, werde ich mir anschauen. Was ich vorhabe? Ist vielleicht in einem anderen Thread nicht so deutlich geworden, aber die MPC wird bei mir vor allem als Sequenzer genutzt werden, Live dann zum Aufnnehmen der via MIDI aufgezeichneten Sachen. Wollte einfach wissen, welche Vorteile oder Nachteile sich aus dem Zusammenspiel ergeben würden.

Als Clockmaster wird entweder die MPC oder meine SR-18 zum Einsatz kommen, nicht aber der Rechner.

Die 2000XL-Seite ist derzeit eh meine Standardlektüre und mit MIDI bin ich sozusagen aufgewachsen :)
 
B

ballpark

.
ja dann reicht es völlig aus was bereits erwähnt worden ist. hatte auch schon einen Ansatz zu deinem Vorhaben gepostet.

ich habe beides intensiv genutzt Live sowie eine MPC2000XL auch in Kombination.

Live stellt sich zum Glück nicht so ziegig an wie Logic und läßt sich auch als Slave konfigurieren.

Was auch gut geht, ist Live parallel mit einer MPC zu betreiben. Program Changes etc. von Live aus steuern. Sequencer der MPC parallel mit Live Spuren (VST Simpler etc.) betreiben.

Wenn du MIDI beherrschst, sollte das alles kein Problem sein.

Bei mir soll es eine 4000er werden übrigens. Die "mißbrauche" ich als Audiorecorder und Midi Thru Box. Durch die zwei Midi ins, bin ich leider auf 32 Kanäle limitiert.

Ein weiterer Vorteil den man hat, ist man kann seinen Song komfortabel an der DAW fertigstellen. Da macht dann auch ein Rechner wieder Spaß und Sinn.
 
B

ballpark

.
http://www.mstrismusic.com/2008/06/akai-mpc-3000-dirty-south/

Good morning to all..This is a requested tutorial for the Mpc 3000. NewToProduction wanted to know how to make a dirty south “3 6 Mafia” style beat. I have the 2500 and wasn’t sure about the 3000. I went on the hunt and found a few things that may help out… Anyone with the 3000 feel free to add your tips through comments….

There is no set way to get a double time beat . Some people speed the tempo, some use time signatures, and some producers can tap it out manually then quantize. Here I will use the method of changing the time signature, because this was a specific request. The “Time Signature” specifies how many beats are in a measure. This tutorial is to get you headed in the right direction on the Mpc3000, preparing to make a dirty south beat. I won’t be making the actual beat of course, but sharing suggestions on how I would try it if I had the 3000 in front of me. Some producers double the tempo 1st. I like to work with the time signature due to the click track or “metronome” when I record. The click track stays at a normal BPM which makes it easier to count the beats and stay in the pocket when working with double time dirty south beats.

Akai Mpc3000 Manual: Akai Mpc 3000 Manual

Start with a basic 4 bar loop, set tempo to 75 BPM to chnage the time signature refer to page 91 in the manual.

This feature displays the time signature and number of bars in the
active sequence as well as any time signature changes. Press 1
(View/chng T sig) from the SEQ EDIT key menu and the
following screen will be displayed:
========== View Time Signature =========
Bar 1 – 2: 4/ 4
========================================
<Page -> <Page +> <Change TSig>
This screen displays all time signature changes within the active
sequence, and the number of bars associated with each change. If no
time signature changes exist, the existing single time signature and
the total number of bars in the sequence will be displayed. Space is
given for ten time signature changes, with two changes per line. If
more exist, the <Page +> soft key is used to view more pages of
changes, and the <Page -> soft key is used to display earlier
pages.

Change your time signature to 8/4, so your screen would look like this:
========== Initialize Sequence =========
Select sequence: 1-(hats)
===== General ===== ==== Track: 1 ====
Bars: 4 Sig: 8/4 Status:UNUSED
BPM:75.0 Type:DRUM Pgm:OFF
Loop:TO BAR 1 Chn:OFF & OFF
========================================

The fields and soft keys are of the sequence edit screen are:
• The Select sequence field:
This field is used to enter the number of the sequence that is to be
initialized. The selected sequence’s name is shown for convenience.
The “General” section:
• The Bars field:
In this field enter the number of bars for the initialized sequence.
• The Sig (time signature) field:
In this field enter the time signature for the initialized sequence. It
is actually two fields, one for the upper and one for the lower parts
of the time signature.
• The BPM field:
In this field enter the tempo to which you want the sequence to be
initialized. To view the tempo in frames per beat, move the cursor to
the word BPM and use the data entry control to change it to FPB,
just as in the Play/Record screen.

You notice I am at 75 BPMS and using 4 bars. If I am using a 4/4 Time signature the beats will fall 1, 2, 3, 4 in each bar or 4 beats per measure. I changed my time signature to 8/4 now I have beats that fall 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8, or 8 beats per measure. I have “doubled” the amount of beats in my measure, with out doubling the tempo.

Next I want my hats to be double the timing of my drum and snare. In order to do this on the 3000 I would now set the “Time Correct” or quantization to 1/16.

Press STEP EDIT. The Now field will change to the
nearest step. A step is defined as a specific note timing
value, 1/8 notes through 1/32 triplets, set in the Note
value field in the Timing Correct screen. Any notes or
other MIDI events existing in the active track at that
location will be displayed on the screen.

Now from here you can hold down the “Time Correct”/ note repeat and record your hats. This will give you the fast Dirty South Hats. What you end up with is this:

75 bpms

Time sig 8/4

Time correct 1/16

Hats will fall on every beat of the measure and you will have 32 hi hats in a measure when you record holding down “time correct” or Note repeat with these settings.

Now try adding a snare on the “TICKS” at 2,4,6,8 this will give you a basic pattern with the hats going fast and the snares hitting on time with the Bpm. From there add your kicks starting on the 1st” Tick” and you are on your way.

Remember this isn’t set in stone…try using a Time Correct of 1/32. Try speeding up the tempo to 140, and changing the Time Correct to 1/16 for the hats and then start adding your snares… play around and find what works best for you. Once you get used to it, changing the time signatures makes a difference on the way samples hit as well. Take some time to learn more about beats and measures, this will give you the technical understanding of whats going on when producers say ” double time”. With practice you’ll get it down in no time.
 
microbug

microbug

MIDI Inquisator
Eigentlich sollte es bei mir auch ne 4000er werden, sind mir dann aber zu selten/teuer und vor allem einfach zu groß, das Ding bekomm ich derzeit nicht unter, ohne üble Verrenkungen machen zu müssen. Daher die 2000XL zum Einspielsequenzen, der Feinkram wird dann in der DAW gemacht. Ich könnte zwar auch mit dem Sequenzer des PC361 einspielen, der aber nicht Pattern/Loop-orientiert arbeitet.
 
microbug

microbug

MIDI Inquisator
Als Schaltzentrale hab ich hier die beste überhaupt: MIDITemp PMM-88. Damit kann ich verschalten ohne Ende, vor allem Standalone. Da sind dann Setups für alle möglichen Kombis drin, Konzept steht bereits, bzw. wird das Prinzip meiner alten Setups übernommen, das hat sich bewährt.

So einen Noname-Kabel würde ich eher nicht über den Weg trauen. MIDI anständig zu implentieren schaffen die Wenigsten heute (vor allem Merging), da wird einfach irgendein Standardcode reingeklatscht und fertig. Die eingesetzten Klein-MCUs haben nichtmal genug Speicher, um Sysex zu puffern, und entweder das wird von vorne herein außen vor gelassen oder es kann Dir passieren, daß eine Sysex-Nachricht unterbrochen wird - was unter keinen Umständen sein darf. Nee. Sowas kauf ich nur von Herstellern, von denen ich weiß, daß sie sowas auch können :) Das nur als Einwurf.

Die MPC kommt jedenfalls mit beiden Ports an die PMM dran, dann bin ich am flexibelsten. Erstelle mir gerade einen Plan für die Verschaltung, hab ich früher mit der großen Akai auch immer so gemacht, sonst gibts keinen Durchblick.
 
audiotrainer

audiotrainer

||||
Re: AW: AKAI MPC 60 - 5000

ballpark schrieb:
Live stellt sich zum Glück nicht so ziegig an wie Logic und läßt sich auch als Slave konfigurieren.
Wieso? - Logic als (SMPTE)-Slave zur MPC funktioniert doch auch (wenn auch manchmal wirklich etwas hakelig, jepp).
Das mache ich ich immer so, um Tracks aus meiner 2.5k exakt timinggenau in den Rechner zu bekommen .
 
B

ballpark

.
ja richtig, etwas hakelig. 90% sind keine 100%

wenn schon eine routbare Midi Matrix da ist, klar dann die.
 
 


Neueste Beiträge

News

Oben